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Dolls' Houses
Past & Present

A website and ezine about dolls' houses: antique, vintage and modern.
Plus furniture and accessories.

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Brooksey (Admin) commented on a gallery item

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Brooksey (Admin) commented on a gallery item

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Brooksey (Admin) commented on a gallery item

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Brooksey (Admin) commented on a gallery item

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Brooksey (Admin) commented on a gallery item

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Brooksey (Admin)created the topic: Obituary

Topic title: Obituary


Topic bescription:

Tony, of Delph Miniatures, died recently. We learned of his passing from an obituary posted on the Miniatura Facebook page, which was copied to the Miniatura website.



I've added this post for those of you who aren't on Facebook, or who haven't seen the news on the MIniatura website. Delph Miniatures are currently regular exhibitors at Miniatura, York Dollshouse and Miniature Fair, and the Kensington Dollshouse Festival, and also showed at other fairs in the past. Tony would be known to many regular attenders at those events.



Our condolences to Tony's family at this sad time.



 



 



 



 



23 hours ago

Brooksey (Admin) commented on a gallery item

1 day ago

Brooksey (Admin) commented on Outside painted with gloss paint, eek!

Topic title: Outside painted with gloss paint, eek!


Yes, as Kitty has indicated, removing gloss paint is one of the worst and most tedious tasks when restoring a vintage dolls' house, and it isn't always easy to get it off without destroying the original paintwork underneath. 

If the gloss layer is very thick, simply repainting over the top as it is could still look awful, especially if the gloss has been badly applied, and is full of runs, brushmarks or debris (including more than one stray paintbrush bristles, as one of my houses had!), so it should still be removed before repainting. Use a matt emulsion paint. (Some members have recommended Annie Sloan Chalk Paint as a nice finish for dolls' houses). A final topcoat of clear matt polyurethane varnish can be applied to protect the new surface from fingermarks, if you wish.

Scraping/chipping off the paint is really the only method of removal - start on an unobtrusive area if you can, whilst you experiment.

You might be able to chip it off a little at a time with a scalpel or small sharp scraper, but this likely to work best on older repainting, because the overpainting itself is starting to degrade with age. (Some restorers have been known to use their fingernails! I've used an old, thin-bladed table knife, with a square-ish tip, which I sharpened on coarse sandpaper).

With newer, more modern, tougher paints, nail varnish remover can soften some of them to make scraping easier. If not, I have had success with a water-based paint stripper (I wouldn't use a strong solvent one). If you use any chemicals to help, work on a very small area at a time, scraping off the top coat as soon as it softens/bubbles so it doesn't start to affect the layer underneath. Wash off the residue with water before moving on to the next small patch.

Good luck!




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Brooksey (Admin) commented on a gallery item

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